GRUENFELD DEFENSE
[Event "Gruenfeld Defense"] [Site "TEST"] [Date "2012.05.2"] [Round "1"] [White "Kasparov President"] [Black "Kasparov President"] [Result ""] [ECO ""] [WhiteElo "2800"] [BlackElo "2800"] [Annotator "Mraovich,Robert"] [PlyCount "80"] [EventDate "2012.??.??"] [EventType "tourn"] [EventRounds "1"] [EventCountry "RUS"] [EventCategory "17"] [SourceDate "2012.05.2"] {Kasparov President} 1. d4 (1. d4 Nf6 2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 {6. bxc3 c5 7. Bc4 is playable...} 7. Bc4 O-O 8. Ne2 c5 9. O-O Nc6 10. Be3 Bg4 11. f3 Na5 12. Bxf7 Rxf7 13. fxg4 Rxf1 14. Kxf1 Qd6 15. Kg1 Qe6 16. Qd3 cxd4 17. cxd4 Qxg4 18. Rf1 Rc8 19. h3 Qd7 20. d5) 1...Nf6 2. c4 (2. c4 g6 3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5 8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O Bg4 11. f3 Na5 12. Bxf7 Rxf7 13. fxg4 Rxf1 14. Kxf1 Qd6 15. Kg1 Qe6 16. Qd3 cxd4 17. cxd4 Qxg4 18. Rf1 {h3 is playable...} Rc8 19. h3 Qd7 20. d5 Nc4 {20. d5 b6 is playable} 21. Bd4 Ne5 22. Qg3 Qd6 23. Bxa7 Qa6) 2...g6 3. Nc3 (3. Nc3 d5 4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5 8. Rb1 O-O 9. Be2 cxd4 10. cxd4 Qa5+ 11. Bd2 Qxa2 12. O-O Bg4 13. Bg5 h6 14. Be3 Nc6 15. d5 Bxf3 16. gxf3) 3...d5 4. cxd5 (4. cxd5 Nxd5 5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Nf3 c5 8. Rb1 O-O 9. Be2 cxd4 10. cxd4 Qa5+ 11. Bd2 Qxa2 12. O-O Bg4 13. Bg5 h6 14. Be3 Nc6 15. d5 Bxf3 16. Bxf3 Ne5 17. Rxb7 a5 18. Rxe7 a4 19. Bd4 Nxf3 20. gxf3 Bxd4 21. Qxd4 a3 22. d6 Qe2 23. Kg2 a2 {funny how this pawn keeps running! LOL!} 24. Ra1 Ra3 25. Qf6 Rb3 26. d7 Rb1 27. Qxf7 Rxf7 28. d8=Q+ Kg7 29. Qd4+ Kf8 30. Rxf7+ Kxf7 31. Qd5+ Kf6 32. Rxa2 Qf1+ 33. Kg3 Qg1+ 34. Kf4 g5+ 35. Ke3 Qe1+ 36. Re2 {what a battle going on here!}) 4...Nxd5 5. e4 (5. e4 Nxc3 6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5 8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O Bg4 11. f3 Bd7 12. Rb1 Rc8 13. Bd3 Qc7 14. Qd2 {Qb3 is also playable} Rfd8) 5...Nxc3 6. bxc3 (6. bxc3 Bg7 7. Bc4 c5 8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O Bg4 11. f3 Bd7 12. Qd2 {equal} Qa5 13. Rfd1 Rac8) 6...Bg7 7. Bc4 (7. Bc4 c5 8. Ne2 Nc6 9. Be3 O-O 10. O-O Bg4 11. f3 Bd7 12. Rc1 Rc8 13. Qd2 Qa5 14. d5 Ne5 15. Bb3 Qa6 16. f4 Nc4 17. Qd3 Nxe3 18. Qxe3 c4 19. Bc2 Qxa2 20. e5) 7...O-O 8. Ne2 (8. Ne2 c5 9. O-O Nc6 10. Be3 cxd4 11. cxd4 Na5 12. Bd3 b6 13. Rc1 e6 14. Qa4 Qd7 15. Bb5 Qb7 16. f3 a6 17. Bd3 Bd7 18. Qb4) 8...c5 9. O-O (9. O-O Nc6 10. Be3 cxd4 11. cxd4 Na5 12. Bd3 b6 13. Rc1 e6 14. Qa4 Bd7 15. Qa3) 9...Nc6 10. Be3 (10. Be3 cxd4 11. cxd4 Bg4 12. f3 Na4 13. Bxf7+ Rxf7 14. fxg4 Rxf1+ 15. Kxf1 Qd6 16. Kg1 Qe6 17. Qd3 Qxg4 18. Rf1 Rc8 19. h3 Qd7 20. d5) 10...Bg4 11. f3 Na5 12. Bxf7 Rxf7 13. fxg4 Rxf1 14. Kxf1 Qd6 15. e5 Qd5 16. g5 Rf8 17. Kg1 Qe4 {sorry for all the crowded moves on this page but the Gruenfeld is very complicated! And we are only scratching the surface here! There are other variations that are really interesting! Especially the line where white sacs its a1 rook for black’s dark squared bishop...not yet covered here but I will try to add it later!}

The Gruenfeld Defense is one of the most popular closed openings. When allowing the opponent to create the pawn enter, Black intends to exert pressure on it with pieces later supported by the fianhettoed g7 Bishop and by the detriment c7–c5. The middlegame positions arising are distinguished by complicated struggle with distorted dynamic equilibrium in various parts of the board, that is characteristic of the modern chess strategy. Among the top modern GrandMasters advocting the Gruenfeld are G. Kasparov, Shirov, Leko, and P. Svidler.